Monolith
Monolith

A Monolith, where a decaying tree has been safely stabilised, perhaps with short stubby limbs, this practice is used to completely mitigate any risk of failure, whilst creating a valuable habitat resource; it is usually not expected that the tree will remain alive, although some species may regenerate.

When trees pose an unacceptable risk to public and property, action is required to mitigate the future potential hazard that a tree presents. In public spaces consideration will have been given to divert the public away from the hazard.

A monolithic tree is achieved by removing the entire crown (all the main branches), whilst ensuring the standing stem remains a balanced structure. A periodic inspection may be required even if the tree dies, since the decaying stem may itself become hazardous over time.

Monolithic trees are widely accepted as being best industry practice as an alternative to felling, which in its self should be regarded as a last resort. The habitat created is of great conservational value, supporting a wide range of species that are dependent upon a sufficient supply of decaying wood and cavities.